Introduction to Pressure Canning on February 25th

Introduction to Pressure Canning. Info at https://conta.cc/3wkmN2e

In this class, we will demonstrate how to use a Presto manual stove top pressure canner.
We will go over the basic functions of the canner, safety measures and answer any questions you may have.
We will be canning a quart of chicken broth, each guest will get to take their quart home.

Since there is a wait time during the processing we will have a hands on bread making class going on as well. Learn to make a simple yeast bread recipe and take home your loaf to enjoy.
Join us Sunday afternoon, February 25th from 1-5.
Price:$45
Grace Episcopal Church
Upstairs kitchen
2955 River Rd West
Goochland, VA 23063
Remember, volunteers attend our classes for free.

Register at https://conta.cc/3wkmN2e read more...

How to Establish Plants from Cuttings

An in depth tip guide into successfully establishing your cuttings:



Start softwood cuttings in spring to early summer from new growth. Use stem tip cuttings from healthy, close-noded shoots about 4–6 in long. Should be soft and almost succulent—if bent they will snap or squash if pressed.



A greenhouse is not necessary for successful propagation by stem cuttings; however, maintaining high humidity around the cutting is critical. If rooting only a few cuttings, you can use a flower pot. Maintain high humidity by covering the pot with a bottomless milk jug or by placing the pot into a clear plastic bag. Cuttings can also be placed in plastic trays covered with clear plastic stretched over a wire frame. Trays must have holes in the bottoms for drainage. The plastic will help keep the humidity high and reduce water loss from the cuttings.



Treating cuttings with root-promoting compounds can be a valuable tool in stimulating rooting of some plants that might otherwise be difficult to root. Prevent possible contamination of the entire supply of rooting hormone by putting some in a separate container before treating cuttings. Any material that remains after treatment should be discarded and not returned to the original container. Be sure to tap the cuttings to remove excess hormone when using a powder formulation.

The rooting medium should be sterile, low in fertility, and well-drained to provide sufficient aeration. It should also retain enough moisture so that watering does not have to be done too frequently. Materials commonly used are coarse sand, a mixture of one part peat and one part perlite (by volume), or one part peat and one part sand (by volume). Vermiculite by itself is not recommended, because it compacts and tends to hold too much moisture. Media should be watered while being used.

Insert the cuttings one-third to one-half their length into the medium. Maintain the vertical orientation of the stem (do not insert the cuttings upside down). Make sure the buds are pointed up. Space cuttings just far enough apart to allow all leaves to receive sunlight. Water again after inserting the cuttings if the containers or frames are 3 or more inches in depth. Cover the cuttings with plastic and place in indirect light. Avoid direct sun. Place the cuttings in a location where they will receive a 50/50 ratio of shade to dappled sunlight. For most plants, cuttings thrive on warmth and humidity. Keep the medium moist until the cuttings have rooted. Rooting will be improved if the cuttings are misted on a regular basis.

Rooting time varies with the type of cutting, the species being rooted, and environmental conditions. Inspect the cuttings every two weeks, looking for new leaf growth and root development. If flower buds or blooms develop, pinch them off. New leaves will assist with root growth, but flowers divert energy away from root development.

Newly rooted cuttings should not be transplanted directly into the landscape. Instead, transplant them into containers or into a bed. Growing them to a larger size before transplanting to a permanent location will increase the chances for survival.

Once you feel resistance when slightly tugging on the cutting, it means the roots are sufficiently developed. At this point, you can transfer the cutting to a new pot with fresh potting soil. A small trowel or large kitchen spoon is a good tool for scooping out the rooted cutting and transferring it to its new pot.


Remove leaves that turn brown or black as the stems are rooting. Discard any cuttings that turn soft or show other signs of rot or fungal disease, as these will soon succumb to their disease.


When it's time to move the new plants you propagated from rooted cuttings to the outdoors, it is important to gradually acclimate them to outdoor conditions—a process known as hardening off. This process involves giving the new specimens increasingly longer exposure to the outdoors over a period of one to two weeks. Set the plants outside for only one to two hours the first few days and gradually increase the time exposure. Place plants outdoors during the warmer part of the day, but bring them back indoors during the cool nights. Gradually, the plant will become accustomed to the outdoor environment. Once nighttime temperatures are reliably at 50 degrees Fahrenheit or warmer all night, your new plants can be safely planted in the garden.



Good luck, have fun, and happy gardening!!



Be sure to check out some great cutting options from Forever Foods Farms, Bibb Forest Farm, and established cuttings from Thistledowne Farms now! read more...

Welcome to Fall Line Farms & Local Roots!

The Center for Rural Culture's Fall Line Farms and Local Roots is Richmond Virginia's non-profit online farmers market.

Order what you want. Shop by the item with no minimum order.
Order when you want. Shop as often or as little as you like.
Order from the farms you want. Shop directly from individual farms with no substitutions.

Thank you for supporting our local producers! If you have any questions, don't hesitate to contact us. read more...

How the Market Works

Each week our producers post the products they have available, setting their own prices, uploading their own descriptions and photos. You can read about their farming practices and contact them directly with questions.

Using our Buying Pages, you shop online with us any time between Friday at noon to Monday at midnight. You pay for your order online and then pick it up on the following Thursday afternoon at one of our Richmond area pickup locations.

Orders are delivered fresh, straight from the farms on Thursdays. Our producers share in the delivery process and we rely on volunteers to sort the orders at the pickup locations. This cooperative system allows us to keep delivery costs down to a minimum meaning more money goes back to the producers. read more...

How We Are Different

Fall Line Farms and Local Roots opened in the fall of 2008 with one goal in mind, to help small farms through the challenging season ahead. Since then, we have grown and developed but never wavered from this basic focus.

Our program allows small farms to sell their products as they come available at a competitive fair price that is set by them.

There is no minimum supply required for them to sell, allowing very small start up farms to grow and expand into a larger marketplace. We like to think of ourselves as an incubator for small sustainable farms.

Because our producers share in the delivery, we are able to keep our costs low. That means more money goes back to the farms. We are not a reseller. When you order you are buying directly from the producers in our market. read more...

From Our Blog